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Three Ways a Daily Walk Improves Your Health

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Three Ways a Daily Walk Improves Your Health

Walking is one of the easiest forms of exercise to begin; all you need is a good pair of shoes and an area large enough to stroll around. However, despite its initial simplicity, walking offers a host of benefits to your overall health and is highly customizable. The ability to walk alone, with friends, indoors or outside makes it easy to create a routine that matches your preferences and can be adapted to inclement weather and seasonal temperatures.

If you've considered joining the walking club at Broadmoor Court assisted living community but haven't committed to a decision yet, try talking to some of the members and asking them what they enjoy the most about the activity and what benefits they've experienced. Some of the answers they share may include these three ways that a daily walk can improve your health.

1. More Stamina

We get used to physical activity over time. Though many people can only walk a short ways at first, they will often be surprised a few months later at their improvement if they stick to it. This extra endurance often translates to unexpected benefits, such as making it easier for you to cover more ground while shopping or to join in a game or activity on our assisted living calendar for a longer period of time before you begin tiring.

If you've been regularly walking and notice that you don't feel challenged anymore then try lengthening your time, choosing a path with a gentle incline or adding some small hand weights.

2. Better Blood Sugar Levels

Walking has been acknowledged by the medical community as a good way to maintain healthy blood sugar levels for many years, and a recent medical study suggests that short post-meal walks may have an even better effect than a single longer walk each day.

The study was published by the American Diabetes Association and noted that eating three times a day and taking a fifteen minute walk after each meal significantly improved glycemic control in the test participants, who were all age 60 and over.

3. Improved Coordination and Balance

 Weight-bearing exercises such as walking, dancing and low-impact aerobics are a great way to naturally increase coordination and balance, which can help prevent falls. As you walk and move around, the body responds to the increased activity by building up your bones and muscles. This added strength makes it easier to remain steady when walking and to catch yourself if you start to slip.

If you're interested in adding these benefits to your own life, talk to your doctor about creating a walking plan tailored to your individual needs and physical abilities. You can also speak with the staff here at Broadmoor Court about the exercise and fall prevention plans available to each of our residents.

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